About SALI

Our Mission

SALI brings together scientists and supporters of science from all backgrounds to promote scientific communication and encourage public engagement with science.

Vision Statement

Our goals are to:

  1. Provide a reliable and trusted resource for scientific information for the local community.
  2. Advocate for evidence-based policies and advance scientific education.

To this end, we will build up our online presence where we create content, share scientifically vetted information, amplify other scientists and science communicators, and continue outreach into the community. We will bring together voices from the scientific community to create spaces for public forums (virtual or in-person) on relevant scientific topics that impact the Long Island community and the community at-large, and support and promote policies by local lawmakers that are evidence-based.

Meet the Team

Dr. Miriam R. Fein

Founder & Executive Director

image-left Miriam earned her undergraduate degree from Queens College (CUNY) in Biology (2003), her Master’s degree from Hunter College (CUNY) in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology (2006), and completed her Ph.D. at Stony Brook University in Genetics (2016) under the guidance of Dr. Mikala Egeblad at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL). There, she discovered a novel mechanism of immune suppression in breast cancer, whereby CCR2 signaling in cancer cells suppresses immune control of tumors, in part by reducing CD103+ dendritic cell recruitment (Cancer cell CCR2 orchestrates suppression of the adaptive immune response). She served as the Reviews Editor at Genes & Development at CSHL Press before going back to the bench as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the lab of Dr. Semir Beyaz (CSHL), investigating the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which diet-induced obesity promotes cancer progression by altering the immune system. Miriam founded Science Advocacy of Long Island (SALI) in 2017, and is passionate about science communication and policy. Miriam lives in Plainview with her three children, Esther, Ezra, and Tehila. She is an avid trail runner who loves to run ultra-distances, and has completed races up to 100 miles.

Jeremiah Bautista

Director of Technology and Multimedia Communications

image-right Jeremiah earned his B.A. from Stony Brook University in Economics. While not a true science, economics is often referred to as the “dismal science” by those who study it. Jeremiah first became of a fan of science when he and his family would watch the original Star Trek TV series as well as Star Trek: The Next Generation. The setting of those shows, a utopian society that humanity achieved through their understanding of the sciences, is something that still resonates with him today. He currently works as the sole Systems Administrator for several medical practices. In his spare time you will likely find him running the beautiful trails throughout New York.

Jeanette Hafke

Volunteer

image-left Jeanette earned her BFA in Graphic Design in 1992 from School of Visual Arts (SVA). Along the way, she stumbled into web design and development due to a chance conversation with an Anime distributor at I-CON. With encouragement from her brother-in-law and a lot of self-teaching, this passion evolved into an online career spanning nearly two decades. Jeanette has worked at CMP and UBM as a web producer, designer and front-end developer (InformationWeek.com, DarkReading.com, Optimize.com, WinMag.com, and more), was an internal communications intranet and newsletter consultant for Oracle’s North America Marketing team, and currently is a web producer, article PDF producer, and enewsletter consultant for the Bridgespan Group, as well as working as a web producer, directory researcher, and social media consultant for Mulesoft’s ProgrammableWeb.com. She also assists several clients with production, design, development, and hosting on a variety of smaller sites. Jeanette loves to champion a good cause and has always loved science. She is married and lives in East Meadow with her two children Timothy and Sarah, and her very large Lab-Dane mix, KitKat. When not behind the keyboard, she is an avid crocheter, DIYer, and maker.

Sharon Becker

Volunteer

image-right A resident of Long Island, Sharon has always had an interest in environmental issues and conservation. She enjoys working as an advocate on public policy issues. Working with SALI enables her to combine her past experiences working in the Massachusetts Senate and private sector. Sharon has a BS in Marketing from the University of Massachusetts and a JD from the Western New England University School of Law. She is admitted to the MA state bar.

Dr. Kimberly Bell

Volunteer

image-left Kimberly is passionate about science communication, as well as teaching and learning with a focus on STEM disciplines. She is always looking for strategies to improve her teaching and communication skills. Kim is currently a Postdoctoral Associate in the Center for Excellence in Learning & Teaching (CELT) at Stony Brook University (SBU) where she leads CELT’s initiatives for Graduate Teaching Assistant and Postdoctoral teaching professional development and develops/teaches workshops for all levels of faculty on student engagement, online teaching, and assessment. She recently served as Lecturer in Undergraduate Biology at SBU, teaching General Genetics and Introductory Lab, and as Workshop Supervisor for the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science. Kim has a PhD in Genetics from SBU, MS in Neuroscience and Behavior from UMass Amherst, and BS in Psychology/Biology from SBU.

Dr. Anna Li

Volunteer

image-right Anna went to Stony Brook University for a BS in biology, and Ross University School of Medicine for a MD. “I try my best with tweeting different kinds of #scicomm messages on the SALI twitter handle. Between new scientific findings and exploring the different ways scientific research is important to everyone, there’s a lot to choose from. I think that with such an abundance of riches, a lot can get lost for people without a scientific background. The 280 character limit is a perfect way to get everyone interested.”

Caitlyn Cardetti

Volunteer

image-left Caitlyn graduated from Minnesota State University, Mankato in 2013 with a B.S. in Human Biology and Psychology with a minor in Chemistry. Post-graduation, she worked in Quality Control at Coloplast and as a Research Assistant for the Behavioral Medicine division of Psychiatry at Columbia University. She is now a Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology Ph.D. student under the guidance of Dr. Daniel Bogenhagen at Stony Brook University. She hopes to establish fundamental knowledge of mitochondrial function so that she can later apply its dysfunction to research for Alzheimer’s disease. Outside of lab, she enjoys running, watching hockey, and being involved with scicomm. She is the administrator of a neuroscience rotational curation on Twitter called @Neurotweeps. In the past, she’s been involved in science outreach through Pint of Science, Taste of Science, and New York Academy of Sciences.

Robert Rainer

Volunteer

image-right Robert is a scientist at the National Synchrotron Light Source II at Brookhaven National Laboratory. His background is in Material Science, Electron Microscopy and Particle Accelerators. His current research focuses are Algorithms, Artificial Intelligence and Artificial Neural Networks. He also participates in public outreach via platforms such as Science Advocacy of Long Island (SALI) and Summer Sundays at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Dr. Robert Wysocki

Volunteer

image-left Bobby earned his undergraduate degree from Hamilton College in Biochemistry/Molecular Biology in 2007. He is currently an MD/PhD student at Stony Brook University. He earned his PhD in Genetics from Stony Brook University in 2016 in the laboratory of Dr. Mikala Egeblad at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. His research focused on Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs), and he discovered a novel role for NETs in a mouse model of breast cancer lung metastasis. After graduation, he plans on beginning a residency in Internal Medicine.